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Net Zero of construction in Malaysia.

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The construction industry is one of the largest contributors to global carbon emissions. According to a report by the International Energy Agency, the construction sector is responsible for approximately 38% of global carbon emissions. In Malaysia, the construction sector is a major contributor to the country’s economy, but it is also a significant source of carbon emissions. As the world moves towards a more sustainable future, the construction industry needs to play its part in reducing carbon emissions and achieving net zero. In this blog, we will explore more about the net zero targets for the construction sector in Malaysia.

Achieving net zero emission by 2050
Net Zero Target for the Construction Sector of Malaysia

The Malaysian government has set a target of achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050. This target is in line with the Paris Agreement, which aims to limit global warming to below 2°C above pre-industrial levels. The construction sector of Malaysia is a key component in achieving this target, and the government has identified the need to reduce the carbon footprint of the sector.

The construction sector of Malaysia is diverse, including residential, commercial, and infrastructure projects. To achieve net zero, all types of construction projects will need to be considered. The government has identified several strategies to reduce the carbon footprint of the construction sector, including the use of sustainable building materials, energy-efficient designs, and renewable energy sources.

In addition to these strategies, the government is also encouraging the adoption of green building certifications, such as the Green Building Index (GBI) and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). These certifications provide guidelines and criteria for sustainable building design, construction, and operation.

Furthermore, the government is promoting the implementation of sustainable construction practices such as reducing waste, minimizing energy consumption during construction, and promoting the use of public transportation for construction workers. The implementation of BIM and digital technologies can lower carbon footprint by improving efficiency and reducing waste in construction.

Sustainable Building Materials

The use of sustainable building materials is one of the most effective ways to reduce the carbon footprint of the construction sector. Traditional building materials, such as cement and steel, are responsible for a significant amount of carbon emissions. However, some alternatives are more sustainable, such as bamboo, wood, and recycled materials.

In Malaysia, there is a growing trend toward using sustainable building materials. Bamboo, for example, is a widely available material that is strong, durable, and sustainable. It is also a carbon sink, meaning that it absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The use of bamboo in construction can significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a building.

Energy-Efficient Designs

In Malaysia, there are several initiatives to promote energy-efficient designs. The Green Building Index (GBI) is a rating system that assesses the environmental performance of buildings. The GBI awards point for energy efficiency, water efficiency, indoor environmental quality, and the use of sustainable materials. Buildings that achieve a high GBI rating are considered to be more sustainable and have a lower carbon footprint.

Energy-efficient designs are another strategy to reduce the carbon footprint of the construction sector. Buildings that are designed to be energy-efficient use less energy and emit fewer carbon emissions. This can be achieved through the use of insulation, energy-efficient windows, and passive solar design.

Renewable Energy Sources

The use of renewable energy sources is another strategy to reduce the carbon footprint of the construction sector. Renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power, are becoming more affordable and accessible. Buildings can be designed to incorporate renewable energy sources, such as solar panels and wind turbines.

In Malaysia, there are several initiatives to promote the use of renewable energy sources. The Feed-in Tariff (FiT) scheme is a government initiative that promotes the development of renewable energy sources. Under the FiT scheme, renewable energy producers are paid a premium for the energy they produce, making it more financially viable to invest in renewable energy sources.

Conclusion

Achieving Net Zero in Malaysia’s construction sector requires sustainable building materials, energy-efficient designs, and renewable energy sources. This will contribute to reducing carbon emissions and achieving a more sustainable future. By adopting these measures, Malaysia’s construction sector can make a significant contribution to mitigating climate change and environmental impact.

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